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Know More About Hot Tools Hair Dryers

Hot tools are one of the most preferred brands when it comes to hair styling devices. They are well known for the quality, reliability, design and their features. The design and performance of these devices are excellent and preferred by people all around the globe. They are economical and save a lot of power as it helps to dry the hair faster than the normal dryers.

High quality hot tools hair dryers come with all the latest technology. Tourmaline and Direct iron technology are their main innovative features. These helps in achieving super fast drying and at the same time provide safety to your hair. The tourmaline heating technology is far better than the conventional metal heating. It avoids the problem of getting too dry. The far-infrared heat produced by the tourmaline components takes out the impurities and bad odour from the hair. It preserves the moisture and oil content of the hair. They do not make the hair blunt or brittle.

The direct ion technology is a revolutionary breakthrough in the field of hair drying. With the integration of this technology the hair can be dried as much as 45% faster than the normal dryers. It gives the hair a shiny appearance and reduces the frizz that is prone to occur while drying the hair. It also adds volume and bounce to your hair making it attractive. Thus the end result is silky soft, shiny hair.

Hot tools hair dryers also provide features like adjustable temperature control, auto turn OFF facility, ON/OFF switch, 3 way adjustable fan speeds, universal voltage usability, 360 degree swivel cord and much more features. They offer a wide range of products and each one are uniquely designed to meet the varying requirements of the customers. The diffusers of these hair dryers are designed in such a way that it provides uniform distribution of air flow.

The price of Hot Tools hair dryers can vary from $20 to $ 100. As the technology, performance and features included increases, the device becomes costlier. But what you have to keep in mind is that, it is your hair. Give it the best you can. The beauty of your face is greatly depended on the appearance of your hair.

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Things to Think About When Purchasing a Direct Mailing List

You can either start a direct marketing campaign to reach out to your current customer database or you can purchase a direct mailing list from a list broker or list manager to connect with new prospects. If you’re considering purchasing a direct mailing list, there are several factors you should think about.

Decide on Contact Method

The first step is to decide how you want to reach your prospects. Do you want to do a direct email campaign, do you want to reach out by telephone, or do you want to try an email campaign? Each contact method has its own considerations.

When deciding on a contact method it is extremely important to ensure you know the various rules and regulations governing each direct marketing method. If you are planning on purchasing a telemarketing list, take the time to research the Do Not Call regulations. If you decide an email blast is the way to go, make sure you know CAN-SPAM requirements.

Not educating yourself on the rules regulating the marketing method you use could cost you.

Know Your Target Market

The next thing you need to do is determine what group would be most interested in your products and services. This is called a target market and your direct mailing list should be tailored specifically to contact them. Are you promoting your products to consumers or business? If you don’t know who your target market is, try looking at your current customer base and use their features as the model for your target market.

How Often are You Going to Reach Out?

Is your direct marketing campaign going to be ongoing or is it going to be one and done? This factor will probably be determined by what the purpose of the campaign is. Are you reaching out to new prospects to try to create awareness or are you trying to promote a limited time offer? Repetition is important with any marketing campaign, the more you can get your message out the better.

Direct Mailing Lists do allow for one-time or multiple uses. One-time use mailing lists are typically cheaper that multi-use lists as you are only using the list once. With multi-use lists you pay full rate for the first use and a reduced rate for each subsequent use.

You just need to make sure that you are clear on what the usage guidelines are of the mailing list you are purchasing. If you use a mailing list multiple times when it’s a one-use only list, you are going to be charged a hefty fine.

How Many Contacts?

The size of the mailing list you purchase can be determined by a couple of factors. First is the marketing method that you decide to use.

Email lists have a greater success rate if they are sent out to a large quantity of contacts. The average open rate of an email campaign is 18 – 20%, with the average click through rate after the being opened is 3 – 4% (rates vary depending on the subject line and relevancy). This means out of 1,000 emails sent, roughly 200 will get opened and of those, 8 will respond to the call to action. A larger email list will ensure that your message will be opened and reacted to.

The size of the telemarketing list should be determined by the number of callers you have. If you plan on outsourcing to a call center with several callers, then the telemarketing list should be reflective of that. A telemarketer can make anywhere between 300 and 500 calls in an eight-hour shift. If you have 4 telemarketers calling, you can go through roughly 8,000 names in a week. Conversely, if you only have one person in-house making calls when they have the time, you could go through only 100-150 names in a week.

The number of contacts on a mailing list will be mostly dependent on budget. With direct mail campaigns, the list is usually the cheapest part, especially if it has a lot of contacts. Printing and postage can get quite pricey if the list you’re mailing to is large.

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Open Relationships in Real Estate

Let’s face it, open relationships are great. You get the best of both worlds. I am speaking of listings, of course. Why do listing agreements needs to so exclusive? It is understandable that no one, in their right mind, would want to spend time and literal money to spin their wheels to sell a listing only for the listing to be swept away by another agent.

So, ultimately, agents are operating under the fear of loss instead of the hope for gain. However, there is more to money to gain than there is to be lost (assumptive. Some agents do spend more than their commission pays, but they don’t last long. How could any business?) If a listing pays a commission of $80,000, and you assume that on average it costs $2,000 to market/list a property (including fixed costs, variable costs, and overhead), it seems like the reward would outweigh the risk. Every Wednesday people go waste $1, or more, on a lottery ticket in hopes to win millions. Every open listing you work on is basically like playing the lottery; but!, you have the ability to change the odds in your favor. It seems so simple, so why not give it a try?!

OK, so here’s the kicker… It may be safe to assume that there are absolutely no brokers in your niche market that would ever consider an open listing agreement. So, when you tell clients that you will list their property and allow them to also list with other brokers in town as well, your clients will be excited at the possibility of every brokerage in town fighting to sell their property. However, when the clients call the other brokers in town the other brokerages will decline to work with an open listing. Therefore, your open listing is basically an exclusive listing.

Additionally, only make the listing agreement for 30 days. Do not allow the listing to auto-renew. By only allowing 30 days you force yourself to have “that” talk with the clients once a month instead of every 90 days. Within a month you should be under contract, or know why the property hasn’t sold. At that time, you and the client can figure out what needs to change for next month, or just part ways. No one likes to be contractually obligated to another party, especially when neither of the parties no longer see eye-to-eye. So make the break-up simple, if it needs to happen.

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Marketing Your Rental Condo

Renting out a condominium property is not a walk in the park. High rise condos are being built left and right and there are a number of rental units that have been sitting in the market for a long time, losing value every day. However, this does not mean that you can’t be a successful landlord. If you know how to market your rental property, you’ll find the experience rewarding and profitable.

Experts in leasing out high rise condos weigh in on the best practices in marketing these urban properties. Here are five tips you can easily implement.

Sell the Lifestyle

Urban dwellers are becoming more sophisticated nowadays. Gone are the days when a home is merely a roof over one’s head. One’s address is an important status symbol, a representation of his or her achievements and a testament to the lifestyle he or she lives. Sure, renters still care about a condo’s square footage and other physical details, but what’s more important is the lifestyle associated with it. Why do you think 90210 is such a coveted zip code? It’s because of the lifestyle that comes with it.

Tell potential tenants how your rental condo is the choice address among emerging executives or how it epitomizes artistic living. In talking with potential renters, use buzzwords representing the lifestyle that your condo stands for – young, dynamic, fashionable, stylish, sophisticated and the list goes on and on.

Your Condo is Only as Good as the City Amenities Surrounding It

One of the reasons that more and more people are moving to the city is the wide array of amenities it presents. The endless strips of restaurants, the booming clubs and sprawling shopping malls, just to name a few, are important features to highlight when marketing your condominium. Living in a home that is just a few steps away from these establishments is a coveted factor of city living.

For example, you can highlight how your rental unit in a trendy high rise condo is situated right in the center of Phoenix’s thriving urban epicenter. How they can wake up and walk to get the best cup of latte in town. Underscore how a restaurant owned and operated by an award-winning chef is just a stone’s throw away. Don’t forget to mention that a huge shopping complex is just a few blocks away. These are the things that will convince potential lessors that they hit the jackpot with your condominium.

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Social Media to Farm Potential Home Buyers

Marketing plays huge part on the success of selling your house. We’re talking not just about marketing. We’re talking about effective marketing. In today’s world where every one seems to cyber social, property marketing should also be taken to the social media world. If you are currently in the process of selling your house, here are 4 tips to help you use social media to effectively farm potential home buyers.

  • Carefully select which social media platform to use. Different social media platforms have thousands to millions of users. The numbers expand rapidly to even larger numbers every second. Thus, there is a huge possibility to farm potential home buyers if you’ll only carefully select which platforms to market your house for sale. Choose platforms which you are well-versed of so you don’t have to seek help from other people on how to use them. If possible, identify whether your target market has large presence on the specific platform you have chosen.
  • Use relevant keywords. Changes in the algorithms of search engines have allowed social media content to be indexed too. Thus, you should also learn how to use effective and relevant keywords which you feel potential home buyers will type and enter into search engines. One of the best ways to ease up on this is to put you in the situation of a home buyer. Think of terms you’ll use if you are going to buy a house!
  • Talk about your house. Social media is such a powerful venue to talk and discuss about everything. Grab this favorable condition to tell other people what you love about your house. You can focus on one feature at a time discussing why other people would also love to see them. Simple yet inspiring narratives about your house will motivate other people to share them. The chain of reposts may start with your friend or someone who just dropped by your post because of a keyword you have used.
  • Use texts, photos, and videos. Dynamic and engaging content does not rely solely on descriptive and narratives. While textual information will speak well of your house for sale, some photos and videos will also help potential buyers to have a glimpse of the property. High quality photos and videos should be used for clearer views. What you have to upload should not only depict of specific house parts. Make the photos more meaningful by capturing a picture of the garden with bees, butterflies, and bees flying around. Perhaps the video of playroom with your kids enjoying the most of their playtime. These real-life photos and videos will make potential buyers understand what the house means to you and what they can expect to experience when they buy it.

By following these 4 tips, you are about to increase your online visibility towards farming more potential buyers for your house for sale. Expect to have more people contacting you for more information or it is better to anticipate more potential buyers arranging for a physical visit of the house.

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Are you a mortgage lender

Are you a mortgage lender looking into entering a marketing services agreement with a real estate brokerage firm? Or you might be a real estate brokerage firm looking to enter into a marketing services arrangement with a mortgage banking firm. In either event, both companies know that they can’t pay the other company for the referral of business due to the anti-kickback provisions listed in Section 8 of the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act (“RESPA”). But mortgage lenders can pay real estate brokers for valuable services related to advertising the lender’s services to consumers served in the community by the mortgage banking firm.

We can all learn how to set up a Marketing Services Agreement properly so that we stay out of trouble with regulators and avoid lawsuits. Let’s ask some questions and provide some answers about Marketing Services Agreements (“MSAs”).

1) Why do we do marketing services agreements?

Answer: RESPA prevents mortgage lenders from paying real estate firms for the referral of clients. But the law permits validly set up and properly maintained marketing services agreements where the lender pays the real estate firm for performing certain defined advertising services for the benefit of the mortgage lender.

2) What do I need to do to make sure I am doing them properly?

Answer: Both parties need a defined marketing services program that is based on various policies, procedures, review, and confirmation that specific services bargained for were in fact provided in a documented and confirmed manner. You also will want to identify and define the specific advertising services that your company permits in these arrangements. It’s the lack of a defined program that often leads to companies entering into marketing services agreements with risky terms that likely should not have been entered into by the parties.

3) Do I need to do economic analysis?

Answer: Yes, it is important that the mortgage lender pay the realty firm the reasonable value of the services provided for each service contracted for. Most mortgage banking firms will hire a third party to perform this economic valuation. There’s some good reputable firms out there that perform these services and it will be important to work closely with these firms to be sure that a proper economic evaluation was performed for each advertising services to which the parties will agree in their MSAs.

4) Can I enter into a MSA with any type of business person?

Answer: This is a judgment call/ Typically you will want to enter into an MSA with a real estate brokerage firm or possibly a home builder. Remember that our focus here is identifying firms that we would want to spend advertising dollars with to reach out to consumers who need mortgage financing for their home purchase.

5) How do I know I am not paying too much for a service?

Answer: Again, get an economic valuation done by a reputable firm that understands this business and have them value each service that will be listed in your MSA. Always pay less than the valued amount for each service to be on the safe side.

6) What services can I contract for with the real estate firm?

Answer: We have seen website advertisements, email blasts, signage at the realty firms, and hourly consulting services as some examples.

7) What controls do I need to ensure my MSA process is compliant?

Answer: We recommend that you perform a monthly review of your MSA and obtain proof that all services contracted for were indeed performed as agreed.

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Pet grooming professionals

One of the most frequently asked questions that new internet marketers have is “Why am I not getting enough traffic to my website?”

And the answer is always the same- “Because you are not posting enough content out there”. That’s it.

Content= Traffic= Sales

So… What’s this rush about social networking?

Well to quickly tell you exactly how you can get tons of free targeted traffic for your website using social networking, I need to emphasize here that social networking is a daughter of Web 2.0 . OK son too… Whatever!

So to begin with, let’s talk about what is web 2.0 . Well Anything beyond text and images is web 2.0. You might recall the earlier days when internet was just new and ordinary people had just started using the internet, the websites were mere collection of static pages. By static I mean, the pages were created and edited by owners of the site and the visitors or the end users had no access or control over the content of the website. All they could do was read and see the images.

But people started realizing that more is the amount of content on websites, more is the amount of traffic they would get. And then the geniuses figured out that the best way to have fresh, quality content in large volumes on to a website was to “allow” the users to post content.

That’s where it all began.. The web 2.0 thing.

Talking about traffic. Well there are tons and tons of methods of getting traffic to your website. But all these methods can be classified in terms of buying traffic, borrowing traffic or creating traffic. You can either buy traffic, borrow traffic, or create traffic.

Let’s talk about buying first. PPC, Solo ads, email campaigns, banner advertising etc are all the methods of buying traffic. It simply means paying to get traffic to your websites. Now, if you are just starting out, I would NOT recommend that you start by buying traffic. Because buying traffic is not easy. Its a total art. Why? Simply because of the enormous amount of competition out there. But unfortunately, this is the way most people start. They try to buy traffic to get rich and end up losing the overall game.

Now let’s move on to borrowing traffic. Borrowing simple means leveraging the other peoples’ traffic. It refers to JV promotions where a person who has some existing traffic to their website redirect or channel their traffic to your website in return of a cost. You can pay them on a pay Per Sale basis which is the most common. But JVing is impossible unless you have your own products by which I mean the products that you have created. Now if you are just starting out on the internet then naturally you do not have your own products. And that is fine. Before you have your own product, you need to be an expert and that is impossible if you are a new internet marketer. So borrowing is also out.

And the last thing that remains is creating your own flow of traffic…ie your own basic stream of free targeted traffic that is coming over to your website all the time. Even while you sleep. Having a small yet constant stream of free targeted visitors visiting your website is the best thing that can happen to you. And this is the thing that you need to focus on. Because that way you will be constantly making sales here and there and that will keep you going with your spirits high and momentum of content creation large.

Now creating your own traffic is not that easy. It requires some groundwork. You need to work. You will need to create content. And you might have to wait for a few days before you start seeing any traffic even if you are constantly putting out content out there. While I recommend you do create a lot of quality (fresh, original and valuable) content to post out there, it’s definitely not the fastest route to getting traffic.

So then, what is the fast way? Has it got anything to do with creating content?

Well, creating “relevant” content and posting it at “smart” places with “wise” usage.

Let’s Talk about it now.

Relevant content = content that is related to the kind of products that you are selling. Content that is valuable and entertaining and educating for any person interested in your niche. Content that is personal… That involves you speaking to the reader or listener directly as I am talking to you right now. Content that shows and personifies you and demonstrates your beliefs.

So remember the four keywords whenever you are creating content… Humorous, Heartfelt, Helpful, Honest. If your content satisfies all these four adjectives, then its great content as far as getting traffic and marketing is concerned.

Now lets talk about smart places … Post your content at those places where there are people who are looking for the kind of information that you are telling. (Or selling or whatever! Internet Marketing- Selling=telling the right things to right people that’s it.)
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Social Networking websites are great places to find millions of people (OK.. I will take that down to thousands, Fine?) who are potentially looking for the kind of products that you are promoting and selling. These are also the places where you can start getting traffic as quickly as in fifty minutes. And these are sources of fast, free, targeted traffic that converts like crazy… All for your websites. So if social marketing is not a part of your overall traffic mix, then I recommend you make it.

Now let’s talk about “wise” usage of your content. Well, all I mean to say here is that you do not need to create new content every time you feel the need to post it. All you need to do is to repurpose all your content. Repurposing your content simple means this-

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Scissors to Razors – Achieving the Best Hairstyles With the Right Tools

Ensuring your customers leave with the best haircut is a concern many barbers and salon specialists have on a daily basis. The most commonly needed tools include shears, scissors, clippers, and razors.

When purchasing your tools, make certain that you have a variety available to use, as this will enable you to achieve the best cut for that client with allowance for customization. Additionally, there is a variety found in each type of tool–for example, with shears, the variety in detail is so great, that you can find variations in blades, handles, and types of thumb grips. Regardless of hair type, the key to using any of these tools is to maintain their original sharpness. It is important that you find a reliable professional who has had prior experience with sharpening hair tools to help with the task.

Scissors & Shears Where an even cut is very important to the overall look, regular sharpened hair scissors are the best tool for the job. Many ergonomic designs are available today making the cutting a much more comfortable process. A popular model is the three-holed handle or the standard two-holed handle with a swivel thumb that allows for greater flexibility when styling. Left-handed scissors are also available. Primary differences between scissors and shears are the size of the blades and handles. Scissors & shears are great for:

  • Clean & even styling
  • Long or short fine hair, tightly coiled or kinky hair
  • Clean, even cuts like bobs and accents like bangs
  • Trims (which may be needed depending on your style)

Thinning Shears Thinning shears are different from regular shears because instead of having two smooth blades, thinning shears have one smooth blade and another with teeth (with variations in the number & width of teeth). The blade with the teeth goes on top of the hair and the smooth blade goes underneath. Most commonly, wide-toothed thinning shears are used on thick hair as it removes more hair in greater chunks. Reducing the thickness in their hair enables them to more easily style it for everyday wear. Thinning shears are great for:

  • Lightening long, short, straight, or wavy thick hair
  • When creating a layered hairstyle, these can be used for a less “choppy” layered look

Clippers Clippers come in many sizes, shapes, and motor strengths allowing you to better customize your client’s desired look. The numerous guards a clipper comes equipped with help control how much hair you are taking off. The clipper keeps a consistent blade setting allowing you to clip hair to your client’s desired length.

  • Thick or fine short hair; tightly coiled or kinky hair, afros
  • Extremely short, buzzed type styles, spiky hairdos
  • Bald or nearly bald styles

Razors Styling razors will most commonly come with a handle for easy maneuvering. The more pricey models have swivel blades on the handles adding flexibility. Replacement blades can be found in any drugstore or beauty supply shop. It is very important to replace the blade of your razor when it is no longer sharp because this ensures a precision cut. Razors should be avoided with curly or frizzy fine-haired clients, as this tool will only create more frizz for them. Razors are ideal for:

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Your prostate supplement should

“Attention to health is life’s greatest hindrance.” Plato (427-347 B.C.).

Plato has succinctly captured the attitude of most men towards health. More than two and a half millennia later, surveys conducted show that most men pay little or no attention to their health needs.

  • According to “2009 Men’s Health Report: A Comprehensive Look at the Status of Men’s Health in Georgia,” men die early because of behavioral and lifestyle patterns.
  • According to a survey conducted by Lieberman Research Worldwide Prostate Cancer Foundation/Gillette Men’s Health Survey (2006) only 20 percent of the men over the age of 50 have ever discussed their family history or personal factors for prostate concerns with a doctor.

Unlike women, who are more informed about women’s health concerns, men hardly ever sit to talk about prostate health. And when they do experience prostate discomforts, they often don’t know which course of action to take and wind up doing nothing.

So here’s a heads up on prostate health! Men, pay attention!

Proactive Tips for Protecting Prostate Health

Lose the extra pounds! The heavier you are the more likely you will develop prostate issues, as well as other weight-related health issues. You can avoid all of these just by making sure you are the optimal weight you should be. Since this is an important factor for good health, consider joining a gym or a fitness center if you find it difficult to lose weight.

Move It! Exercise! Drop the creature comforts we are so used to! Take the stairs instead of the elevator. Park your car as far from the entrance of shopping malls as you can. Buy a bicycle and use it for traveling short distances. Better yet, walk whenever you can instead of using the car. Go for a morning or evening walk or jog. Build up your exercise regimen so that you are getting at least 30 minutes of exercise at least 5 days a week. For prostate health, ask your doctor about Kegel exercises.

Watch what you eat! Try to include plenty of vegetables in your daily diet, along with a healthy fiber intake (about 30 to 35 grams). A diet that is high in vegetable and grain intake is associated with higher incidence of good prostate health. Avoid fatty and fried foods, red meat, junk foods. Include foods like pumpkin seeds, avocados and walnuts which contain a blend of phystosterols, particularly beta sitosterol, which is a prominent natural substance for protecting prostate health.

Regular Check-ups and Prostate Screenings after the age of 40 will help you monitor prostate health and take early action.

Specific Natural Substances that Promote Prostate Health

There are prostate-specific natural substances that not only help to promote prostate health, but also support healthy urinary flow and functions. Beta sitosterol, is the key natural substance. Its efficacy is validated by scientific research and clinical trials. For over two decades, doctors in Europe have been successfully including beta sitosterol and other nutrients in a program for the patients of proactive protection of prostate health. Doctors and medical professionals have popularized the use of beta sitosterol as herbal support for promoting prostate health. There are no known harmful side effects and you’ll find sufficient research data on this subject on the Internet to help you make an informed decision about taking prostate supplements.

Your prostate supplement should include beta sitosterol and other essential nutrients such as Vitamin D, zinc, selenium and other minerals which play a vital role in maintaining the health of the prostate gland as well supporting men’s general health and wellbeing.

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Everyone knows that health insurance

Everyone knows that health insurance costs in America are rising at unsustainable rates, and many are looking for ways they can save. High deductible health plans (HDHP) are often overlooked when searching for health insurance. It’s a shame this is the case, because HDHPs can be a great way to save money on monthly premiums and can provide similar protection as other cadillac plans.

Let us first take a closer look at what a high deductible health plan is and how we can define it. The basic concept of an HDHP is by having a high annual deductible, one can purchase a plan with a low premium because of more exposure to health care costs. High deductible health plans must meet a minimum deductible dollar amount to qualify, and there must be a maximum dollar amount which the maximum out-of-pocket expense may not exceed. In Virginia, many health insurance companies have these high deductible health plans set up so the maximum out-of-pocket is nearly the same as their most expensive plans. A lot of times, health plans with lower deductibles and countless benefits will have a coinsurance rate after the deductible is met, where you pay that percentage of the health care cost until you reach the maximum out-of-pocket. Many high deductible health plans in Virginia are without coinsurance, which allows the out-of-pocket maximum be the same for the various health insurance plans. If you can live without some benefits of the cadillac plans, HDHPs can protect you from the catastrophies equally as well while keeping money in your wallet.

Another area to explore regarding HDHPs involves Health Savings Accounts (HSA). An HSA is a monetary account through an insurance company, bank, credit union, or investment company where you can place money into and watch it grow with interest. In order to set up an HSA, you must have an HDHP, as the two go hand in hand with each other. The account must be qualified as a health savings account, and any contribution made to the account can be written off as an expense for tax purposes. Therefore, if you need to withdraw money from your health savings account for a medical expense, you can pay that expense with pretax dollars and write the procedure off as an expense.

High deductible health insurance plans can be a valuable alternative to a standard health policy. When coupled with a health savings account, you can use pretax dollars to pay for medical expenses to relieve some of your tax burden. HDHPs generally always have lower premiums than health plans loaded with benefits you may not need. By using an HDHP, you can be protected from catastrophic events and lower the cost of your health insurance.